20 Crutch Words That You Unknowingly Use To Spoil Sentences Every Day
×
Hero Image
Abstract

20 Crutch Words That You Unknowingly Use To Spoil Sentences Every Day

And will realize today.

April 12, 2018

Article By- FT Crew

Home/Abstract/20 Crutch Words That You Unknowingly Use To Spoil Sentences Every Day

If you too have a friend who says "obviously" nearly every fifth word, you will have a good answer to present, the next time they do so. Good grief!

Also, you might be driven bonkers by the like thing - like, like ... I mean you know like it was ... like I had ... like a ... boom ... just shoot me!

Why do people have to use these crutch words and spoil the beauty of sentences? How worthless the piece of literature looks when crutch words slip into sentences. We might use them to give ourselves more time to think or to emphasize a statement, but we actually, honestly, literally and obviously ruin a sentence just like this.

Here is a list of 20 crutch words that might make you sound like a fool before people. Be careful while you use them the next time in your speech or writings.

1. Actually:

‘Actually’ is the best example of a crutch word. It is meant to signify something that exists, but it is more often used to add punch to a statement (ex - "I actually have no idea").

Actually,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

2. Obviously:

To signify an action which is readily observable, recognized or understood, this crutch word helps the speakers many times. However, it might be irrelevant at times.

Obviously ,Actually,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

3. Honestly:

The word ‘honestly’ is used to emphasize the truthfulness of a fact, but rarely does it happen. The use of honestly casts an impression that you are trying to make something sound truthful, even when it is not.

 Honestly,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

4. Like:

Like should describe something of the same form, appearance, kind, character, or amount. But, very often, it is used involuntarily in conversation, just like um, to take some time to think.

 Like,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

5. Basically:

The word is used to signal truth simplicity and confidence. The crutch usage comes into play when this word is used in the context of things that are far from being basic. ‘Basically’ is used to add authority and finality to statement, which is poorly conveyed.

Basically,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

6. Literally:

This should be used in a sense that it describes an action occurring in a strict sense. However, it is mostly used to refer to a hyperbole or figurative statement. ‘I literally ran 300 miles today’, is one such wrong usage.

Literally,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

7. So:

We usually use the extended form of this word and even the iterative form sometimes. It makes it so, so horrible that the ears close themselves. ‘So, here’s what I have …’ gives a hedge signal to the listeners, showing nervousness.

so,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

8. Well:

The word well usually comes when you are doing something professional and you need to emphasise on it. For example, ‘Well, the results are…” but this crutch word makes the writing piece horrible.

Well,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

9. Look:

To you and me, ‘look’ appears as the speaker’s invitation to see and understand the speaker’s point of view. But is it necessary to understand it? Even when you don’t want to? Crutched!

look,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

10. Awesome:

It is on the semantic speed-dial whenever a compliment or positive description is needed. The repetitive use of this word shows mindless involvement into things. It is a crutch word that hides original thinking.

Awesome,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

11. Seriously:

It is so overused that it rarely emphasizes anything serious. ‘Seriously injured’ is the appropriate usage but ‘seriously funny’ is what we make it.

Seriously,abstract, literature, English, language, usage, words in English, humour, English words, crutch words, list of crutch words, crutch words list, feeding trends, feeding, trends, now trending, faults in speaking, faults in writing, English speaking flaws, English writing flaws, English words with meaning
link

12. Totally:

“I am totally into it.” Or “This is totally relevant.” are common phrases that people use. Remove the crutch word and these phrases will seem to have more credibility and will no longer sound like a gum-smacking tween.

link

13. Essentially:

People use this word to emphasize finality or to use as a filler to elongate a sentence. The use of the word essentially is not essential. It adds no value to the sentence except the pause.

link

14. Really:

It is a bitter-sweet word in English. It provides a lexical boost to the description at hand and generates engagement with the audience. The crutch should be removed to enliven your speech.

link

15. Very:

It happens to be another very widely used crutch word. It helps the listener to understand that the talk is more than just average engagement. But, if you consider yourself a listener, you will feel pissed off.

link

16. Just:

It appears small, but it adds undue pause to the speech. Used to signify a simple action, over reliance on ‘just’ is redundant and more effortful. So, ‘just’ don’t do it.

link

17. Right:

As with the crutch words covered so far, the use of ‘right’ mostly sounds wrong. It is like you are forcefully trying to convince people with respect to whatever you have said. Right?

link

18. Fantastic:

Listeners often perceive these as a sign of over hyped complimenting. But ‘fantastic’ is one crutch word whose one-time use makes the listeners feel lack of involvement. It is fake praising.

link

19. Great:

It makes the subject sound excessively big. Great is another over rated praise, crutched to the core.

link

20. Super:

Popularised by Shilpa Shetty’s dialogue, the word ‘super’ is unnoticed as a crutch word. It gives a feeling that you have substituted your views with one word.

link

Any message that must be delivered could be structured without the use of any of those 20 crutch words. The more we look at the list, the less we like these words. We all can easily recall the last time we used these words.

How many of these crutch words you have used?

ADVERTISEMENT

You May Also Like

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT